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Saturday, April 23rd, 2016 marked the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare. It’s also believed to be his birthday, based on the recorded date of his baptism. Historians will likely never cease to debate this.

It’s no secret that I love Shakespeare. It’s not just a love of his writing, though. It’s a joy to hear his work performed, to see the incredible understanding that he had of the world around him. He was a man who embraced the differences in cultures, who invented words and phrases that have become commonplace, and who has influenced countless writers over the centuries.

I’ve seen and read a lot of Shakespeare’s work. It’s sort of a thing about earning an English degree, but it started long before college. My English teachers in high school had us read at least one Shakespeare play each year. I attended travelling performances that came to my town as part of a program called Shakespeare on the Plains (one cast included my future theatre professor). I own a few different copies of the complete worksk, and I’m most proud of an annotated set which belonged to one of my high school teachers. I have yet to read any of them in their entirety. And you know something? That’s okay too. He was an incredibly prolific writer. You don’t have to have memorized every sonnet and soliloquy, or even know what those things are, to appreciate Shakespeare.

My absolute favorite Shakespeare play is The Tempest, though sadly, I’ve never managed to catch a live performance. Several years ago, however, a new film version of it was released, starring Helen Mirren as Prospera (a very clever casting and genderswapping of the role of Prospero). This is probably my favorite production of the show, and is absolutely phenomenal. Djimon Honsou co-stars as Caliban, with Felicity Jones (soon to be starring as Jyn Erso in Star Wars: Rogue One) as Prospera’s daughter, Miranda. If you haven’t seen it, I highly recommend it.

And a couple of notes on The Tempest. It’s the show in which I feel the greatest connection between one of the characters, Prospero, and Shakespeare. In Act IV, Prospero has been using his magic to perform a little show for his daughter and the young man who is wooing her. When he realizes that the time has come for the act to end, he says:

“Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Ye all which it inherit, shall dissolve
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep. Sir, I am vex’d;
Bear with my weakness; my, brain is troubled:
Be not disturb’d with my infirmity:
If you be pleased, retire into my cell
And there repose: a turn or two I’ll walk,
To still my beating mind.”

He’s done with his life as a writer, it seems. Tired of his life of creating illusions for the people, Shakespeare is voicing his exhaustion through Prospero. The time, it would seem, has come for him to focus elsewhere. There’s a tragic beauty in it. Since The Tempest is believed by many to have been Shakespeare’s final play (or at least the last that he wrote on his own), Propsero’s dialogue at the close of Act V has always felt like a farewell message from the Bard himself.

“Now my charms are all o’erthrown,

And what strength I have’s mine own,
Which is most faint. Now, ’tis true,
I must be here confined by you,
Or sent to Naples. Let me not,
Since I have my dukedom got
And pardoned the deceiver, dwell
In this bare island by your spell,
But release me from my bands
With the help of your good hands.
Gentle breath of yours my sails
Must fill, or else my project fails,
Which was to please. Now I want
Spirits to enforce, art to enchant,
And my ending is despair,
Unless I be relieved by prayer,
Which pierces so that it assaults
Mercy itself and frees all faults.
As you from crimes would pardoned be,
Let your indulgence set me free.”

How’s that for an epitaph?

And so, while I may have missed the actual date by a couple of days, I would like to reiterate my love for the writing this man accomplished. Shakespeare will always be one of my favorites. Happy birthday, Will. 400 years after you died, you work lives on.

This one’s another entry for one of Chuck Wendig’s Terrible Minds Writing Challenges. We were given two lists of twenty words, picking one from each list to create a random title. After a day of brainstorming, the final line popped into my head. So, here you are. It’s a flash piece, really. Not even 500 words, but I like it. I hope you do too.

 

“Orchard After”

 

They met as children, wandering across the meadow that connected their parents’ farms. They became friends instantly, each thrilled to have the other to talk to, to share in the collective adventure that is youth. Rain or shine, they would meet. Every day during the summer, and every free moment during the school year, they were together. One would wait for the other at the old apple tree in the middle of the meadow.

Borrowing tools and parts from their parents, they built a tree house. It would shelter them from the rain and shade them from the sun more than the tree could alone. The apples fed them when they wished to remain away from home. They took great care to plant the seeds when they could, and in time, they sprouted.

They grew older, and closer together. High school brought them a series of new challenges. They each began work on the farm, learning the trades of their mothers and fathers. In between tasks in the fields, they tended the burgeoning orchard that was now growing Soon, the summer day arrived when they shared their first kiss, hidden from a thunderstorm inside their tree house.

Time passed, and their love grew stronger. Though they could no longer both fit inside the tree house, they could still spend a hot afternoon sleeping beside each other in the shade of the tree’s branches. School came to an end, but still they stayed on, neither willing to part for more than a few days at a time. As their parents grew older, they took over the farms together, consolidating and focusing on the apple orchard.

Years became decades, and the two grew old. They still made and sold apple pie and cider with apples that they grew, having sold the rest of their parents’ farmland, save for what had been the meadow. Children visiting the orchard would play in the tree house while the grownups shopped and sampled. In the quiet evenings, the lovers would meet again, beneath the tree where it had all began. They would sit and hold hands and talk about how quickly the world had gone by.

One winter day, it was time for them to say their final goodbyes to each other. They kissed one final time, pledged their love. The cold took them both, there under the branches of the ancient apple tree, fingers entwined as the roots below. They were buried there, as they had wished for years to lie together.

And as the snow came down, and the years passed, the lovers were forgotten, and all that remained was the orchard after.

 

 

 

 

It’s National Library Week! In fact, today is National Library Workers Day.

That’s right, folks. It’s that time of year again. In celebration, I’m working 40 hours!

Well, I’m doing a few other things, too. It’s not just about being here for the community. As part of that, last week I attended my first ever library conference, PLA 2016. It was an absolutely incredible experience. PLA is held every other year, and by sheer luck, I was given permission to attend for the opening of the exhibits last Wednesday.

It’s a short drive to Denver. I got to the conference about an hour ahead of the exhibit hall opening, and wandered the convention center, marvelling at how weird it was to see the place devoid of cosplayers (since the last time I’d been there was Denver Comic Con in 2013). I watched the bustle of downtown Denver from a balcony, read some Unbeatable Squirrel Girl, and waited as patiently as possible for the doors to open.

When 3:30 finally arrived, I entered the exhibit hall and was blown away by the sheer number of vendors on site. Book distributors Baker & Taylor and Ingram; publishers Hachette, Penguin Random House, Scholastic, and Dorling Kindersley; library service providers Overdrive and Mango… I spent three hours wandering the rows, chatting with representatives of companies like Lulzbot. I got to meet people from libraries around the country. I snagged some ARCs from publishers (stay tuned for some reviews!), got a free mango smoothie from the folks at Mango Languages, and chatted with some library school representatives about my desire to pursue my masters degree. I got to demo some software, play a game of Super Mario Bros. using a system of fruits and circuits as a controller, and drive a BB-8 Sphero toy around. I saw floor models of furniture designed for library use and new construction toys for kids. But the best thing that I saw at the entire conference? People like me. Young people who are just as enthusiastic about libraries as any generation before. People who want to challenge the stereotypes of libraries and librarians alike. People who are eager to spread their knowledge of and passion for libraries around the country and the world.

The future of libraries is bright and varied, folks. Please continue to support yours.

“It’s still National Library Week. You should be especially nice to a librarian today, or tomorrow. Sometime this week, anyway. Probably the librarians would like tea. Or chocolates. Or a reliable source of funding.”
Neil Gaiman

This one’s for Chuck Wendig’s Terrible Minds Writing Challenge. Our instructions were to write a sci-fi story about a dragon, only not necessarily a mythical one. It’s a short piece, well under the 2,000 word limit, but it was something that came to mind immediately after reading the challenge prompt.

“The Dragon”

 

“Are we starting?”

“Yes ma’am. We’re recording right now. You can start wherever you like.”

“I was there that day. They said that there’d been nothing like it since the old calendar, since the bombings on Earth. I never saw footage of those, but I’ve heard statistics. It amaze me still to realize that we used to live in such numbers that the loss of a couple hundred would be considered relatively insignificant. That that could’ve been the better option. I don’t know what exactly this new weapon was. Just the name all of the news outlets on the colony gave it. The dragon.”

***

“Yes, she was the first one to call it that on the intrasystem media. I asked her about it afterward. She said it seemed like a good fit. Something so destructive that it couldn’t possibly be real. She was never the same after that day. Nightmares kept her from sleeping, and eventually she just… she couldn’t stop seeing them.”

***

“What do you remember most about that day?”

“The smell. I’ll never forget the smell. Melting metal, charred flesh. I can’t eat barbecue anymore. The masks could only filter out so much, and we didn’t have them for the first wave. And the heat. Even when we got the bunker gear, we couldn’t stay on site for too long. Dozens of folks were dropping just from the heat.”

“You were with the first responders?”

“We all were. There weren’t enough of us. We didn’t have adequate supplies, or enough people. How can you plan for a disaster on that sort of scale when there’s been nothing like it used for centuries?”

“Had you ever seen footage of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki?”

“Once, when I was a kid. They told us that no one had ever done anything on that sort of a destructive scale since. People kept pointing to those two bombs as one of the worst things that humanity ever did to itself. I wish they’d been right, that we’d never come up with anything worse.”

“You said supplies were inadequate too. Would you like to elaborate?”

“Well, there was no way we’d ever have the rescue equipment or the medical supplies to treat burns of that intensity on that large of a site. No colony would. The governors would never allow the funding for recovery for a disaster that they couldn’t foresee, and half of them are too young to have learned about the bombings back on Earth. They’d dismiss them out of hand and say that we should be prepped for real emergencies. Loss of atmosphere, gravity failure. Things that you expect to happen on an orbiting colony. Not the heat, not a fire so sudden and massive that it burns through 85% of your oxygen supply in a matter of seconds. Not some lunatic trying to hurt or kill everyone. We were damn lucky we didn’t lose the whole colony.”

“But you kept trying, despite being understaffed and under-supplied?”

“We had to. 12 hour shifts and then some, to start. You know how critical the first hours are in a recovery effort. More people died, but we kept trying. We had to, damn it. We had to know that we were doing our best. It was the only way we could keep going.”

***

“I don’t think anyone could have predicted it. My understanding is that the work on the project was so compartmentalized that no one team could’ve put together a solid idea of the whole. Different groups of engineers and scientists working on components on different planets and colonies. No communications other than what was absolutely necessary would’ve been allowed. Tell one team they’re working on one project under one code name. Take their work and have an unaffiliated group start working on it from there under a different code name. Never let the right hand know what the left is doing, you know.”

“Hence why there couldn’t be a contingency in place.”

“Exactly. No one knew what The Dragon was capable of. Just that it was a dangerous weapon.”

“And someone set it off in the middle of a civilian population center.”

“Yes.”

“Do you believe the attack itself was premeditated?”

“We’re done here.”

***

“How many people died?”

“In the initial burst? Estimates say over half a million. The Dragon’s Breath, the mishmash of various ailments people caught in the aftermath is still killing people. Nearly double that.”

“Do you honestly believe it was an accident that the weapon was discharged on the colony?”

“I’d like to believe that, but the investigation is ongoing.”

“Thank you for your time.”

I get to go to my first library conference!

The Public Library Association’s biennial conference is in Denver this year, and my boss acquired passes for some of our staff. While I’m only attending for a day, and only to see the exhibits, I couldn’t be more excited. There will be library people from all over the country coming in for this, and it’s going to be a great chance to do some networking and see what cool developments are in store. I’ll be tweeting from the conference tomorrow, under the #PLA2016 hashtag. If you’ll be there, come say hi.

P.S. Non-library friends in the area, I might be around after!

“When the Sea Meets the Sky”

“I’ll find you again,” she whispered in
My ear before we parted. “I’ll find you
When the sea meets the sky.”

Years passed, and I searched high and
Low, travelling the world over, seeking
Where the sea meets the sky.

Never in that time did I ever meet any
Who loved me as she did, who made
My heart soar to meet the sky.

On the day I knew I was to die, I sat
Alone and waited, certain I would
Hear her voice under the grey sky.

And as the rain began to fall, she
Whispered once again. “My love,
Did you not see how sea meets sky?”

Some quick updates.

We got a cat. Her name is Hermione, and she’s incredibly smart and sweet. However, it’s very true when they say that having a cat is one of the worst things a writer can ever do, re: distractions. I’m learning this all over again.

I got through season two of Daredevil and loved it. Was it perfect? No. Case in point: Asian and Asian American representation. Jon Bernthal kills it as the Punisher/Frank Castle (and I don’t watch The Walking Dead, so I really had no prior experience with his work as an actor). Foggy remains my absolute favorite character on the show. I also finally got to see the first season of Agent Carter, which is a delight. Peggy kicks ass across the 1940s, breaking limbs and stereotypes all the way.

I’ve been working on a D&D campaign for next month’s local game convention. It’s eating a lot of my creative energies, making it tricky for me to focus too much on anything else. I’ve also been reading a LOOOOOT. I knocked out V.E. Schwab’s A Gathering of Shadows a few weeks ago, and I’m in the middle of Sam Sykes’ The City Stained Red, which may be one of the best fantasy books I’ve ever read. I swear it’s like he sat in on some of my college D&D sessions and captured characterization from them. I love it. On a more realistic side, I also just finished reading Tess Sharpe’s Far From You. Holy god damn, this one was intense. Illicit love, murder, drugs, and a quest for the truth keep you turning pages non-stop. It’s not something I expected to pick up, but there was a great discussion of it during a Twitter chat about queer YA titles, and it hooked me.

It’s tempting to use some of what I’ve been reading for the D&D campaign. The magic system from Schwab’s work, for example, is one of the most clever presentations of elemental manipulation I’ve seen since Avatar: The Last Airbender. It would be fun to introduce some plot elements from books and then encourage the kids to go check those books out from my library, and would definitely boost the outreach factor. “Hey kids, if you liked my campaign, try these books!” We’ve already seen a boost in checkouts of our 5th edition manuals. Imagine what that could do for our fantasy literature circulation…

The 3D printer at work is awesome. I’m looking into utilizing it for some cosplay props, and I’m really exicted about the prospect of hosting a cosplay-themed program in our Makerspace soon.

Fireside opens for submissions this Friday. I’m going to be writing. More soon!

 

It’s Doctor Seuss’s birthday!

While the man himself was born in 1904, his birthday is celebrated annually as Read Across America Day.

Doctor Seuss was a huge influence on me when I was a child. My parents both read Seuss books to me and my sisters. I have great memories of listening to “The Sneetches and Other Stories” (which we would borrow from the YMCA Camp of the Rockies library whenever we would visit Estes Park). The first book that I read aloud was “The Cat in the Hat Comes Back,” proving to my mother at a very early age that I was capable of reading on my own. That was where my love of books really began, sitting on the couch in the living room, carrying on where she had left off while she took a phone call. To this day, I will randomly quote “Bartholomew and the Oobleck” or any one of a dozen other Seuss titles.

I love books. Three bookstores and two libraries have served as my places of employment over the last ten years, and it all started with a little rhyme. So, though he’s been gone since shortly after I learned to read, I would like to thank Theodore Geisel for all that he’s done for me and for countless other children across the world. Thank you, Doctor Seuss.

I promised non-sports-related content, and here it is! Brace yourselves, because this is going to be a fairly long and photo-heavy post.

We had a local convention over the past weekend, and I decided to take the time to reflect on my past as a cosplayer and to muse about my goals for the hobby as well. I’ve been cosplaying for almost seven years now, since my first NDK in 2009. While I always loved doing costume stuff for Hallowe’en or for the various school plays I did in high school, it wasn’t until I was in college that I started to attend anime and comic conventions. Since then, my technique has improved drastically. My earliest cosplays were purchased outright, because frankly, I didn’t have any sort of skill when it came to crafting. Now, thanks to many of my incredibly talented friends, I’ve learned to read patterns (and draft my own), operate a sewing machine (my little sister once taught me how to hand-sew), and assemble my own custom costumes. Combine these skills with the Makerspace at my library, and suddenly lots of new possibilities are coming to mind.

In past years, I’ve cosplayed the following characters:

1.) Shikamaru Nara. Shikamaru is the “lazy genius” character from Naruto. A brilliant tactician, he’s far more content playing shogi than conducting battlefield operations, but equally skilled at both. This was a purchased cosplay, but one that I can still return to easily, due to its relative simplicity. It was also the reason I first dyed my hair (I prefer to use my own hair for cosplays whenever possible, as I feel it’s more authentic than using a wig, though sometimes practicality interferes). shikamaru nara shippuden

Shikamaru

2.) Kimblee. Solf J. Kimblee is a state alchemist in Fullmetal Alchemist. Having seen both anime adaptations and read the manga, I much prefer the personality that Kimblee shows in the manga and the Brotherhood series, being far more philosophical and less outright psychopathic. Note that as a character capable of converting literally anything around him into a bomb, he’s no less dangerous, no matter how he’s acting. He’s great fun to play, and very popular at cons. I purchased a state alchemist’s costume (officially a Roy Mustang costume) and utilized the pants and arming skirt, modifying a t-shirt and putting a pair of Renaissance Festival boots to use. I use a sharpie marker to do the palm tattoos for his transmutation circles, and I carry a bunch of cherry Jolly Ranchers around with me to use as philosopher’s stones for photos. Kimblee

Kimblee 2

3.) Grell Sutcliff. Grell’s personality in Black Butler is generally pretty close to that of Kimblee, and so it was an easy transition from cosplaying one to the other. Grell is a Grim Reaper, a harvester of souls who has a tendency to overstep his bounds and get into trouble with his superiors. He also absolutely loves Sebastian, but then, who doesn’t? While initially seen in disguise as Madame Red’s rather clumsy butler, Grell shows his true colors soon enough. This cosplay was the first that I assembled myself. Due to his costume design, he was easy enough to dress as with clothes that I already had on hand. I commissioned an artist online to make his glasses for me and bought a wig (the only one I’ve ever used as a cosplayer), since his vibrant red hair color is hard to reproduce accurately with dye, and my own hair was far too short at the time. Grell

Grell and Madame Red

4.) Ruby Rose. Ruby is the main character of Monty Oum’s Rooster Teeth project, RWBY. This costume was a major step for me for two reasons. It was the first costume that I put together completely from scratch, and it was my first crossplay. Ruby’s very outgoing, and presented a great challenge when it came to staying in character. For this costume, I worked with several of my friends to find the right patterns and fabrics. I even learned to draft a pattern for an underbust corset, which I then made. I also had my hair professionally cut and dyed, as it was a difficult blend of black and red to attempt on my own. Ruby

Ruby 2

5.) Pirate. While maybe not technically a cosplay, this is a costume I’ve assembled over the years I’ve been attending the Colorado Renaissance Festival. It’s one that I’ve worn to conventions as well, just for the sake of something different. This is a constant work in progress, as I add new pieces every season.

Pirate 2

6.) Capitol Resident. The Hunger Games series has inspired countless costume designs, especially for the idle rich of the Capitol. My friends and I would host fashion shows as a group called Colorado Capitol Couture. This particular design was based on my asymmetrical haircut at the time and a pair of shoes that I’d found online, and was a combination of modified clothes from Goodwill and some crafting. The idea in my head was that most of the residents of the Capitol would be above such things as our society’s current gender norms, and the result was a blend of men’s and women’s fashions. Over the last two years, I’ve done several fashion shows and photo shoots for this costume, and it’s always a blast to see people react to the shoes. Capitol

Now some of my aforementioned friends are professional or paraprofessional cosplayers. These folks get to spend some of their time putting together new costumes for big events. One of my friends is Batman. Another is a rising star in the European cosplay scene. Other people I know are designers as well as cosplayers, and create costumes for others to wear. I’m nowhere near the skill level of these folks, but they inspire me to work on new ideas even when budget and time don’t allow for the followthrough of crafting.

So, I’ve got a few ideas of costumes I’d love to put together in the future. There’s no particular ordering to this list, and none of them will really take priority over any of the others, though some will obviously be suited to certain weather conditions.

1.) Trafalgar Law. Law is a pirate captain in the manga/anime One Piece. Nicknamed “The Surgeon of Death,” he’s a rather heroic figure with a tragic backstory (like many characters in the series). The coat makes this one a great winter cosplay, and allows for varying levels of completion, since I could wear street clothes under it until I was able to finish the rest of the outfit. The tattoos on his hands will be a fun experiment, as they’ll require a little more work than the palm tattoos I’ve done as Kimblee.

Trafalgar Law, Post-Time Skip

Trafalgar Law, Post-Time Skip

2.) War Boy. The  War Boys are the main troops serving under Immortan Joe in Mad Max: Fury RoadTrained as drivers, mechanics, and fanatical soldiers, they pursue Max across the wastelands of post-apocalyptic Australia for the promise of reaching Valhalla after death. There are numerous War Boys in the film, and it would be easy enough to piece together a look inspired by the group without aiming for a specific character. This one’s already in progress, having acquired goggles, gloves, boots, etc. I also got a Nerf crossbow to paint up as a prop weapon. I’ve been looking into tutorials for bald caps, because I’d hate to have to shave my head when I’ve got so many other long-haired cosplays planned.

Nux. No spoilers. Just watch the movie.

Nux. No spoilers. Just watch the movie.

3.) Untitled CharaCouture Costume. As a sequel of sorts to the Colorado Capitol Couture costume above, I’m planning a CharaCouture outfit as well. CharaCouture is our group’s new focus, shifting away from The Hunger Games now that the film versions have all seen their theatrical releases. The concept is still to design couture fashions, but with a new emphasis on our favorite film/video game/cartoon characters. I’m currently thinking about something Link-inspired, because the Zelda games are amazing and I look good in green. Incorporating the Hylian crest would be easy enough, thanks to a belt buckle I purchased when Twilight Princess came out. Capes or half-capes are fun, too.

It's a starting point.

It’s a starting point.

4.) Star Wars. With two more main-series films (and several spin-off projects) coming to theatres over the next few years, it seems to me that it’s high time I put a Star Wars costume together. This is one that could vary wildly in terms of complexity. The obvious move to me is to craft a simple robe and carry one of my lightsabers with me. Brown robe with green or blue lightsaber for Jedi, black robe with my red lightsaber for Sith. On the opposite end of the cosplay spectrum would be a full suit of armor. If I did this, I’d likely look to the local chapter of the 501st for a snowtrooper (hey, I live near the mountains, it’s a legitimate option) or to the Mando Mercs if I felt more like displaying my love for Boba Fett and his ilk. The Mandolorian armor would give me a far greater range of customization, but it’s definitely more labor intensive. Seriously. Mad props to the folks who do either of these. You rock.

While I love the First Order designs, the classics feel a little more timeless.

While I love the First Order designs, the classics feel a little more timeless.

5.) Haku. Haku is a ninja from Naruto, and shows up as one of the first major antagonists of the series. He fits into a category of fictional characters that control ice, and is therefore automatically added to my list of awesome people. Despite being a villain, he’s critical to the protagonists’ growth beyond the concept of ninja as tools rather than people. Since my first ever official cosplay was a Naruto character, it would be a fun nod to how far I’ve come.

Best part? No ice puns.

Best part? No ice puns.

In addition to all of the above, I’d love to add to or update several of my older cosplays. Kimblee, for example, rocks a white suit in the latter portion of the manga. Kimblee Suit

Ruby wears several other costumes, including a school uniform. I’d also love to actually put together the Crescent Rose, the scythe/rifle she carries.Ruby uniform

For Grell, I could add the coat and chainsaw. There are lots of options for improving, now that my skills have improved. Grell 2

It’s been a great journey as a cosplayer throughout the years, and I look forward to many opportunities to add to my catalog of characters. Many thanks to all of the other cosplayers out there who have served as inspiration and instruction. Remember that everyone starts somewhere.Beginner

 

The Broncos won. This makes me happy, as both a native Coloradan and a lifelong fan of the team (I’m not the biggest fan, but I appreciate it when the Broncos win). Peyton Manning got another Super Bowl win, which makes me happy as well. When you’ve worked that hard for that long, it’s nice to have that achievement. I’d wanted him to have the same sort of finale to his career that John Elway did. Now he can.

The game was not a particularly spectacular one. There were some great moments, but for the most part, I didn’t feel like I was watching two of the top-rated teams in the NFL. I felt more like I was watching a lot of people who were too tired to keep doing this much longer. This happens when you’ve got defense-focused teams. Von Miller was at the top of his game, and deserved the MVP award. The Broncos played pretty much exactly as I expected them to. The Panthers, sadly, disappointed me. I was expecting more of a team with only one previous loss in the season. Still, I look forward to watching Cam Newton’s growth as a player, and hope for the best for him and his career.

Now for the rest of the Super Bowl-related things. The commercials and the half time show. The commercials in and of themselves mostly fell flat with me. I loved the sheep singing to Queen, though I question the need for a pickup with a stereo system in the bed, especially for ranching purposes (honestly, do you want to be loading feed and manure or what have you on top of your stereo equipment?). Coke did a great job with the Hulk/Ant-Man chase too. The half time show was amazing, with the exception of Coldplay. Bruno Mars? Great! Beyonce? Great! Coldplay? Eh.

Anyway, I return you to your non-sports-related content until the 2018 World Cup, unless the Broncos get back into the Super Bowl next year.

 

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